The changes that came with the reformation of the roman catholic church in the 16th century

Bring fact-checked results to the top of your browser search. The age of Reformation and Counter-Reformation The most traumatic era in the entire history of Roman Catholicism, some have argued, was the period from the middle of the 14th century to the middle of the 16th. This was the time when Protestantismthrough its definitive break with Roman Catholicism, arose to take its place on the Christian map. The spectre of many national churches supplanting a unitary Catholic church became a grim reality during the age of the Reformation.

The changes that came with the reformation of the roman catholic church in the 16th century

Martin Luther has a complex legacy. Many laud him as a historical and theological hero—the German reformer who drove a nail through the heart of works-based righteousness.

This is the kind of stuff that happens after half a millennium, when the tug-of-war between hagiographic fact-or-fiction is won and lost by a slew of different card-carrying demographics: Nazis, evangelical Southern Baptists, liberal historians, and so on.

Let me name four ways. It disarmed the ecclesial meritocracy that suppressed the common man. The 16th-century church service, before the Reformation took hold, was a mindless chore, a political requirement to accrue whatever grace dripped from priestly faucets.

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The Mass trickled out in Latin, unintelligible murmurs to most. And the Eucharist was a one-man show, wherein the priest would engage in a confusing act of metaphysical hijinks, transubstantiating bread to flesh and wine to blood for the supposed edification of all.

Luther, Ulrich Zwingli, and others after them saw a problem. In other words, sola scriptura predicated sola fide ; this is crucial to understanding the thrust of Reformation theology.

On January 1,Zwingli, still a Roman Catholic priest, did away with the traditional Latin lectionary and began expository sermons through the New Testament in his native tongue. Concurrently, Luther translated the Bible into German for his people and had published the Old Testament by All this in the name of getting the very Word of God to people in a way they could not only understand, but respond to.

These actions changed the face of the European church, paving the way for Protestantism as we know it.

No longer were churchgoers passive recipients. Now they were free to be active participants, both intellectually and otherwise. Before, church was a top-down endeavor, but these breakthroughs opened the door to widespread ecclesiological shifts. It reclaimed a biblical idea of the pastorate.

The days of unintelligibly going through the motions had passed. They merely lift eyes to the cross and all the heavenly blessings therein. It restored the sacraments to the people—and began untethering church from state.

How did this shift play out?

The changes that came with the reformation of the roman catholic church in the 16th century

Paedobaptism was an unquestioned staple of the Catholic Church. But it was also a theological conviction held by Luther, Zwingli, and Calvin—along with basically all their contemporaries. With considerable disagreements everywhere else, why the similarity at this point?

Answers to these questions have countless layers. But given that not all reformers held to paedobaptism—Menno Simons and the Anabaptists, for example—one must venture a guess.

Though the reformers departed from Rome, they also departed from one another. Calvin thought the views of both Luther and Rome were metaphysically untenable.

To deny the bodily presence of Christ in his Supper is to deny his omnipresence. In retrospect, such theological quibbling seems myopic.

Though full agreement rarely came, one truth remained unalterably clear: The same should be said about the other biblical sacrament, baptism. With Simons and the Anabaptists, the groundwork toward credobaptism had been established. Despite what the Catholic Church said, paedobaptism cannot confer grace and is not salvific.

No one, by mere happenstance of birth, is wrought in spiritual privilege. Alex Duke is an assistant editor for The Gospel Coalition.The history of the Catholic Church begins with Jesus Christ and his teachings Prior to and during the 16th century, the Church engaged in a process of reform and renewal.

The Council of Trent generated a revival of religious life and Marian devotions in the Catholic Church.

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During the Reformation. The Protestant Reformation was a major 16th century European movement aimed initially at reforming the beliefs and practices of the Roman Catholic attheheels.com religious aspects were supplemented by ambitious political rulers who wanted to extend their power and control at the expense of the Church.

Jul 31,  · Roman Catholicism - The age of Reformation and Counter-Reformation: The most traumatic era in the entire history of Roman Catholicism, some have argued, was the period from the middle of the 14th century to the middle of the 16th. This was the time when Protestantism, through its definitive break with Roman Catholicism, arose .

The 16th-century church service, before the Reformation took hold, was a mindless chore, a political requirement to accrue whatever grace dripped from priestly faucets.

The Mass trickled out in Latin, unintelligible murmurs to most. Reformation, also called Protestant Reformation, the religious revolution that took place in the Western church in the 16th century. Its greatest leaders undoubtedly were Martin Luther and John Calvin.

The changes that came with the reformation of the roman catholic church in the 16th century

Watch video · The Reformation was a 16th-century religious and political challenge to papal authority in Catholic Europe. Read more about Martin Luther, the Thirty Years War and the Counter-Reformation.

Roman Catholicism - The age of Reformation and Counter-Reformation | attheheels.com