A look at peoples thoughts about sharing information in public media

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A look at peoples thoughts about sharing information in public media

Those who use Facebook were more willing to share their views if they thought their followers agreed with them.

If a person felt that people in their Facebook network agreed with their opinion about the Snowden-NSA issue, they were about twice as likely to join a discussion on Facebook about this issue.

Facebook and Twitter users were also less likely to share their opinions in many face-to-face settings.

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This was especially true if they did not feel that their Facebook friends or Twitter followers agreed with their point of view.

For instance, the average Facebook user someone who uses the site a few times per day was half as likely as other people to say they would be willing to voice their opinion with friends at a restaurant. If they felt that their online Facebook network agreed with their views on this issue, their willingness to speak out in a face-to-face discussion with friends was higher, although they were still only 0.

Overall, the findings indicate that in the Snowden case, social media did not provide new forums for those who might otherwise remain silent to express their opinions and debate issues. Further, if people thought their friends and followers in social media disagreed with them, they were less likely to say they would state their views on the Snowden-NSA story online and in other contexts, such as gatherings of friends, neighbors, or co-workers.

This suggests a spiral of silence might spill over from online contexts to in-person contexts, though our data cannot definitively demonstrate this causation.

A look at peoples thoughts about sharing information in public media

It also might mean that the broad awareness social media users have of their networks might make them more hesitant to speak up because they are especially tuned into the opinions of those around them. A rundown of the key survey findings: People reported being less willing to discuss the Snowden-NSA story in social media than they were in person—and social media did not provide an alternative outlet for those reluctant to discuss the issues in person.

Social Media And Psychology -- Why Do People Share?

This challenges the notion that social media spaces might be considered useful venues for people sharing views they would not otherwise express when they are in the physical presence of others. Not only were social media sites not an alternative forum for discussion, social media users were less willing to share their opinions in face-to-face settings.

We also did statistical modeling allowing us to more fully understand the findings by controlling for such things as gender, age, education levels, race, and marital status—all of which are related to whether people use social media and how they use it.

That modeling allowed us to calculate how likely people were to be willing to express their views in these differing settings holding other things constant. Similarly, the typical Twitter user—someone who uses the site a few times per day—is 0.

In both offline and online settings, people said they were more willing to share their views on the Snowden-NSA revelations if they thought their audience agreed with them.

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Previous research has shown that when people decide whether to speak out about an issue, they rely on reference groups—friendships and community ties—to weigh their opinion relative to their peers.

In the survey, we asked respondents about their sense of whether different groups of people in their lives agreed or disagreed with their positions on the Snowden leaks. There was some notable variance between those who feel they know the views of their peers and those who do not know what others think.

Generally, the more socially close people were—e. At a family dinner, those who felt that family members agreed with their opinion were 1.Learn why people share social media content here. It’s a simple question that lacks a simple answer. Why People Share: The Psychology of Social Sharing - CoSchedule Blog.

Understanding why people participate and share via social media has been a hot topic in academic circles for a while. There is quite a large literature stream dedicated to the subject - later in the blog we look at a recent study by Harvard University.

Why People Post their Innermost Thoughts on Social Media Author By. Dr Jillian Ney. A Look at People's Thoughts About Sharing Information in Public Media PAGES 5. WORDS 1, View Full Essay. More essays like this: Not sure what I'd do without @Kibin - Alfredo Alvarez, student @ Miami University.

Exactly what I needed. - Jenna Kraig, student @ . There are currently billion social media users attheheels.com means that over a third of the world’s population is using some form of social media to communicate, making social media marketing an imperative tactic for boosting leads for higher education programs.

A look at peoples thoughts about sharing information in public media

In fact, we found people were less willing to discuss their opinion on the Snowden-NSA story on social media than they were in person. And Facebook and Twitter users were less likely to want to share their opinions in many face-to-face settings, especially if they felt their social audience disagreed with them.

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Home › Blog › Social Media And Psychology — Why Do People Share? Social Media And Psychology — Why Do People Share? Social media usage has grown to become one of the most pervasive cultural phenomena in America. public figures, or people with unique and insightful jobs provide users with the chance to conduct a crowd-sourced.

How social media is reshaping news | Pew Research Center